Friday, July 31, 2015

Sea Turtle Sight Words Game {free printable}


We're still working on sight words with our 5-year-old. To make it a little more fun, I designed this BINGO-like game to play.


This beats the pants off of flash cards any day. Who wouldn't want to play a game with a turtle named Ollie, Netty, Timber, or Ziggy right?!?

The game I made contains eight turtle playing cards, a set of hatchling call cards with the sight words, and one blank turtle template for anyone who wants to customize the game for their child's learning level.

Download the 9-page PDF for free from Google Drive here.


To get the game ready, simply cut everything apart and grab some small items to use as game pieces. We used small flat glass baubles, but pennies or buttons would also work great. Each player will need a maximum of 13.

Place all the hatchling call cards face down in a big "go fish" pile. One player (or a parent) will select a card from this pile and read the word. 

Other players must scour their turtle card and place a game piece over the sight word if it's present. 


Play continues this way until all the sight words on one player's card have been covered; they're declared the winner!

Want a great book to extend the learning? We read The Green Sea Turtle by Isabel Muller. It taught my son all about the long journey of one sea turtle and its return to the beach where it was born to lay eggs. 

Wednesday, July 29, 2015

History of Flight Printable Board Game


One of the learning themes I planned for us this summer was flight. We've had a LOT of fun making gliders and airplanes and parachutes, but now it's time to put the science aside and focus on the history of aviation.

To do this we could (of course) read books, but I think learning history through a timeline game is WAY more fun.



This game was a labor of love. I hope your kids will enjoy it as much as mine have. Note: It's a lengthy game with lots of reading; I recommend playing with kids 8+. (While our almost-six-year old played along, he grew tired of the slow pace.)

How to Make the Game
Download the PDF of the game, milestones, and game pieces from Google Drive here.




This game would not have been possible were it not for the excellent record-keeping and timeline reporting by The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics.

Print the game pieces and game board on heavyweight cardstock. (Print milestones on office paper.)

Assemble the game board with tape. Since your home printer doesn't print full-bleed (i.e. all the way to the edge of the paper), you'll have to trim the white edges.

Don't worry about cutting the milestones apart; it's easier to leave them as pages and clip together with a binder clip.

Cut apart the game pieces and fold each. Insert the folded end into medium-sized binder clips. (We used small clips and were constantly righting our fallen game pieces. Larger clips will be more stable.)

How to Play
Put all game pieces on the words "START." Player 1 rolls a die and moves their game piece the number of spaces rolled. Whatever number they land on on the board, they should read the event that corresponds. 



The card may provide additional instructions - Fly into the Future (i.e. move forward) a noted number of spaces, Go Back a certain number of spaces, or You're Grounded (i.e. stay put). The player must move forward or back after reading the event. 

It's up to you whether you then read the next event that the player eventually lands on or just move and don't read. (We played this way to speed up an already lengthy game; gauge your child[ren]'s attention span.)

The first player to the finish wins.

Read
We've read a bunch of great books that would be perfect to pair with this game. For a relatively quick picture book, I'd recommend Gail Gibbons' Flying. It provides an illustrated snapshot of the history of flight. The others were also our favorites.

Monday, July 27, 2015

After School Linky 7-27

Welcome to the party!

Summer is whizzing by at record-breaking speed. I hope you're having fun with your kids! 

If you need some ideas, you've come to the right place.

This Summer Rocks! Diamonds at Doodles and Jots





Sidewalk Chalk Clock Game at Creative Family Fun


The After School Linky is cohosted by
Relentlessly Fun, Deceptively Educational
We would love to have you link up your School-Age Post (Ages 5 and up) about your learning week after school including Crafts, Activities, Playtime and Adventures that you are doing to enrich your children's lives after their day at school, home school, or on the weekend!
When linking up, please take a moment to comment on at least one post linked up before yours and grab our after school button to include a link on your post or site! By linking up, you're giving permission for us to share on our After School Pinterest Board and feature an image on our After School Party in the upcoming weeks! 

Friday, July 24, 2015

Acids and Bases: Using Red Cabbage Juice

Some science experiments really wow. This is one of them.

My oldest son tested a variety of different substances to determine if they were acids, bases, or neutral. He did this using an indicator that we made from red cabbage.


Here's how we did it.

Make the Indicator
Peel about five leaves off a head of red cabbage and put in a blender with nine cups of water. Set on high until the cabbage is finely ground and the water is purple. Note: This makes A LOT of indicator so if you're not planning to go crazy testing many substances, reduce the mixture down to 3 leaves and 6 cups of water.

Beware; it smells. B-A-D


Using a fine mesh sieve, strain the blended cabbage over a pitcher. Voila! Your red cabbage indicator is ready!

Testing substances
Fill small disposable plastic tumblers half full of the indicator. Add a teaspoon or two of every substance to each cup. If the substance is an acid, it will turn the liquid from purple to pink or red. If the substance is a base, the red liquid will turn blue, green, or yellow.


I made an worksheet with a scale to help my son. I printed an extra of the color scale and laminated it so he could even hold it next to the tested liquids. Click on the picture below to download a free PDF on Google Drive.


Remember not to pour any substance in one of the cups. This will help you compare those substances which may not appear to turn the water.


The acids-bases scale shows the corresponding pH. Substances that are acids have a ph of less than 7; substances that are bases have a pH of more than 7.

Possible test substances include:
vinegar
salt
baking soda
lemon/lime juice
rubbing alcohol
handsoap
bleach*
milk
egg whites

*Exercise caution when using bleach. It's a powerful chemical! Grown ups should pour this.

Our favorite test substances were vinegar, lime juice, baking soda, and bleach.

To explain acids and bases, why not watch a YouTube video?!


This great activity came from Steve Spangler Science

Monday, July 20, 2015

After School Linky (7-20)

Welcome to the party!


I hope you're all staying cool this summer. It's like Mother Nature just turned up the thermostat in our little corner of the world. Thank goodness there is the pool, and loads of great indoor activities to do.

Here's some inspiration if you're in the same predicament.


A Boredom Buster: Make a Flying Toy at Planet Smarty Pants

Make Your Own Log Catapult at Brain Power Boy

 Free Pioneer Pack at 3 Dinosaurs


The After School Linky is cohosted by
Relentlessly Fun, Deceptively Educational
We would love to have you link up your School-Age Post (Ages 5 and up) about your learning week after school including Crafts, Activities, Playtime and Adventures that you are doing to enrich your children's lives after their day at school, home school, or on the weekend!

When linking up, please take a moment to comment on at least one post linked up before yours and grab our after school button to include a link on your post or site! By linking up, you're giving permission for us to share on our After School Pinterest Board and feature an image on our After School Party in the upcoming weeks!