Monday, October 20, 2014

After School Linky 10-20


Welcome to the After School Linky Party!


Did you go pin crazy at last week's party? There were SO MANY great ideas and activities!

Here are a few of my favorites.

DIY Refrigerator Letter Magnets at Look What Mom Found


Fire Safety Week at Planting Peas






Gruffalo Themed Shape Animals at The Educators' Spin on It




Word Family Blackout at This Reading Mama


What have you been doing with your kid(s)? Please share!

The After School Linky is cohosted by
Relentlessly Fun, Deceptively Educational

We would love to have you link up your School-Age Post (Ages 5 and up) about your learning week after school including Crafts, Activities, Playtime and Adventures that you are doing to enrich your children's lives after their day at school, home school, or on the weekend!

When linking up, please take a moment to comment on at least one post linked up before yours and grab our after school button to include a link on your post or site! By linking up, you're giving permission for us to share on our After School Pinterest Board and feature an image on our After School Party in the upcoming weeks!

Friday, October 17, 2014

Magnetic ABC Ocean


There's just something about magnets. Kids love 'em. My boys are no exception.

I made a fun way for my 5-year-old to practice letter recognition using two magnets. This is an easy, low- or no-cost activity that's great for working on the alphabet or even spelling.


Supplies
Disposable dinner-sized paper plate
Ocean scene (download the one I made as a free PDF here)
Sticker paper (or regular office paper and a glue stick)
Two magnets (one decorated with a fish button, sticker, etc.)
Scissors

Assembly
Print the ocean scene and cut it along the circle guideline. Attach to your paper plate.


How to Play
Put the fish magnet on top of the ocean scene, and the other magnet under the plate. By moving the bottom magnet, your child will be able to make the fish swim from one letter to the next in the ocean.

You can call out the letters in the alphabet, have them move the fish through the letters in their name, or even practice their spelling words.


This is surprisingly captivating and held my young son's attention much longer than I anticipated. When he grew weary, we read two great books.

Wednesday, October 15, 2014

5 Senses FREE Printable Board Game


Our 5-year-old was learning about parts of the body in his alternative kindergarten class a week ago. I thought it would be fun to focus on the five senses, engaging him with a board game played like Candyland.


It was fast paced and fun and will most certainly because of the repetition help him remember what all five senses are.

Constructing the Game
Download a 3-page PDF of the game I made here. The file includes a spinner and a two-page game board.


Print the spinner on sticker paper (or office paper and use a glue stick). Adhere it to a thin piece of cardboard (an empty cereal box works perfectly) and cut it out. Use a nontraditional paper punch to make a small hole in the center. Thread a brad through a paper clip and into the hole, separating the brad at the back. Make sure there is enough slack for the paperclip to spin freely.


Trim the game board pages if necessary (most printers don't print full-bleed and leave a white edge along the border) so that they match perfectly along the center. Tape in place.

Now all you need is a different game piece for each player. Use LEGO minifigures, different colored buttons, glass baubles, or even chocolate candies.

How to Play
The first player flicks the spinner and moves their game piece to the sense indicated by the paperclip. For instance, if they spin and the paperclip points to the stinky-smell-wrinkly-nose picture, then the player moves their game piece to the first stinky-smell-wrinkly-nose pictured space on the game board. If the space the spinner stops on has a "2" on it, they move their game piece to two stinky-smell-wrinkly-nose pictured spaces (for example).


As players approach the end, the spinner must land on the last sense on the board in order for him/her to finish the game. The first player to succeed at this is the winner!

Play and Read
There are loads of great books on the five senses. These were my boys' favorites.



Our 5-year-old son and I read My Five Senses by Aliki. This book begins very simply, with one sentence per page explaining each of the five senses and builds to get kids thinking about when they're using more than one of their senses at once. The colored pencil illustrations are charming and the text is simple enough so as not to be overwhelming for younger kids who are just being introduced to the subject.

Our 9-year-old read You Can't Taste a Pickle With Your Ear: A Book About Your 5 Senses by Harriet Ziefert with illustrationS by Amanda Haley. The book and its whimsical pictures could very easily trick you into thinking it's all fun and no facts, but you'd be mistaken. Facts and explanation about how the body works are also included. Brilliant!

Monday, October 13, 2014

6 History Games for kids (+ Other Ideas to Bring the Past to Life and the Linky!)


History can be a tough subject to teach. Kids can feel disconnected and find it difficult to relate to people and events from the past. Making it fun is the trick. Here are six of my free printable games to illustrate that point.




Want more great ideas? Go clickin' crazy ...

LANGUAGE ARTS

CRAFTS
Dye Yarn with Kool Aid at Mama Smiles
OJ Carton Lantern and Paul Revere's Ride at Relentlessly Fun, Deceptively Educational
Pioneer Crafts for Kids at The Crafty Crow

BOOKS

MUSIC, ART, & FOOD
Bake Civil War Hardtack at Education.com
6th Grade Carved (Egyptian) Cartouches at There's a Dragon in My Art Room

HISTORY UNITS
History Mini Units for Busy Families at Planet Smarty Pants

HANDS-ON ACTIVITIES
Hands On Pompeii Lesson (archeological LEGO city dig) at Adventures in Mommydom
Presidential Paint Stick Timelines at Relentlessly Fun, Deceptively Educational
Mummification: Let's Mummify Barbie at Kids Activities Blog

COSTUMES & ROLE PLAYING
DIY George Washington Wig at Relentlessly Fun, Deceptively Educational
Kids bring famous people to life with this DIY Living History Museum at The Educators' Spin on It
Viking Shield {upcycled history craft} at Relentlessly Fun, Deceptively Educational
Wearing Lincoln's Hat at Relentlessly Fun, Deceptively Educational
I am Pharaoh {craft and writing prompt} at Relentlessly Fun, Deceptively Educational

PUZZLES & CIPHERS
Reading Comprehension with the Greek Alphabet at Relentlessly Fun, Deceptively Educational
Preamble Scramble at National Constitution Center

What have you been doing with your kids? We'd love for you to share!


The After School Linky is cohosted by
Relentlessly Fun, Deceptively Educational

We would love to have you link up your School-Age Post (Ages 5 and up) about your learning week after school including Crafts, Activities, Playtime and Adventures that you are doing to enrich your children's lives after their day at school, home school, or on the weekend!

When linking up, please take a moment to comment on at least one post linked up before yours and grab our after school button to include a link on your post or site! By linking up, you're giving permission for us to share on our After School Pinterest Board and feature an image on our After School Party in the upcoming weeks!

Wednesday, October 8, 2014

Equivalent Fractions Pegboard Practice


Reducing fractions (or equivalent fractions) is part of my oldest boys' fourth grade curriculum. And since he's ahead of the class when it comes to math, I figured I'd give him an introduction at home before they start tackling the topic at school.



To do this, I made a page for him to match equivalent fractions using our pegboard (see how I made our wood and nails pegboard here).

What I love about these pegboard pages, are that they're like multiple choice questions. He has a limited number of answers to choose from so it's not overwhelming and all you need is a nontraditional hole punch and rubberbands to practice an endless amount of skills.

Download this 1-page PDF here.



My son did great stringing rubberbands from one nail to another to match the equivalent fractions!


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